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Sense and Sensibility

'The more I know of the world, the more am I convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!'Marianne Dashwood wears her heart on her sleeve, and when she falls in love with the dashing but unsuitable John Willoughby she ignores her sister Elinor's warning that her impulsive behaviour leaves her open to gossip and innuendo. Meanwhile Elinor, always sensitive to social convention, is struggling to conceal her own romantic disappointment, even from those closest to her. Through their parallel experience of loveand its threatened lossthe sisters learn that sense must mix with sensibility if they are to find personal happiness in a society where status and money govern the rules of love.This edition includes explanatory notes, textual variants between the first and second editions, and Tony Tanner's introduction to the original Penguin Classic edition....

Title : Sense and Sensibility
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780141439662
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 409 pages
Url Type : Home » Sense » Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility Reviews

  • l a i n e y

    [reread] 01.29.18: added another star this time round

    My penultimate Jane Austen novel. (nooooooo!)

    For me, it took too long to get going. Not until they arrived in London that I started to get curious about how the story will unfold and what will happen to the Dashwood sisters. Elinor, I liked well enough but I found Marianne to be too self-righteous and annoying. She did turn a new leaf in the end but I think it came too late for me to start liking her at that point.

    Owning to the fact that bec
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  • Samra Yusuf

    Dear Austen

    I will confess right off the bat that I’m one of those readers who never “got” you. I tried to read Pride and Prejudice years ago, but gave up after a few pages because of your writing style. What can I say – I had less patience in those days with long, indirect sentences which seemed to use 20 words to say what could be easily said in five (hah! I’m one to talk on that score…). I read Emma a few years ago and honestly did not care for it. It wasn’t so much the language this time; it
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  • Kelly

    New review to come eventually. Can't quite put it all into words yet.

    * * *

    ORIGINAL:Ah, the third member of the Holy Trinity of Austen. Also deservedly so. This is my intellectual favorite of the Austens. By that, I'm not calling it "intellectual" I'm just saying that taking emotional attachment to other books out of it, this is my objective favorite Austen. I actually believe that the story of the women is better than Pride and Prejudice. Go on, shoot me for that one. I've taken it before for t
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  • Maria Clara

    ¿Qué puedo decir? Jane Austen siempre será la maravillosa Jane Austen, y esta historia, como todas las que he leído de ella, me ha encantado. Sin embargo, me ha faltado un poquito más de romance.

  • Maureen

    This is the third Jane Austen book I've read and it's by far my favorite. I love the story, love the heroines, love the MEN I just love everything about this. There was so much happening that it never felt slow or boring and the SUSPENSE and REVELATIONS at the end of the book were so fantastically done. AGH JUST SO GOOD.

    TIME TO GO WATCH THE MOVIE.

    Reread mid-Jan to early Feb 2016 for Austentatious

    STILL MY FAVORITE

  • RandomAnthony

    A couple summers back I abandoned Emma after thirty pages. I assumed I'd fall on the “overwritten drama for women who like Colin Firth” side of the Austen conflict, but, after hearing readers I respect praise Ms. Austen and snagging a high-quality Penguin edition at a Borders closing sale, I tackled Sense and Sensibility over the late rainy spring. Now I'm wondering from where my Austen misconceptions emerged. What made me think Austen was boring? Where did I get that idea? Sense and Sensibility ...more

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    Jane Austen’s first published work, Sense and Sensibility, published in 1811, is more straightforward than most of her later works. The story focuses on two sisters, ages 17 and 19, and how their romantic interests and relationships epitomize their different approaches to life. The older sister Elinor embodies sense, good judgment and discretion.



    Her sister Marianne is emotional and volatile, following her heart with a supreme disregard for what society might – and does – think.



    Elinor is pretty m

    The whole of Lucy's behaviour in the affair, and the prosperity which crowned it, therefore, may be held forth as a most encouraging instance of what an earnest, an unceasing attention to self-interest, however its progress may be apparently obstructed, will do in securing every advantage of fortune, with no other sacrifice than that of time and conscience.
    Jane Austen's wit and dry humor really make the story.

    S&S might not be a perfect book, but based on the amount of highlighting I was doing at the end, and my happy smiles when I finished, it gets all the stars.

    Initial comments:

    Buddy read September 2015.

    Here's my problem: I love both the 1995 Ang Lee/Emma Thompson film and the 2008 BBC version, have watched both of them, um, more than once (who's counting?) and now I can barely remember the original novel. That clearly needs to change.



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  • C.

    I wish Jane Austen could see she became an admired literary standard. She conjures such scholarly connotations, I was wary of enjoying “Sense And Sensibility”. I hope my words attain quality that is discussed and absorbed for meaning but books are about the story, personages, message, setting, and sympathizing with them. I couldn't care less about structural intentions, like “symbolism”, thus my reviews are never going to be critical essay types. Just as a novel, I am thrilled to report I liked ...more