Read Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki Online

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert; hes just a regular guy who was stressed at work, insecure, and constantly comparing himself to othersuntil one day he decided to change his life by reducing his possessions to the bare minimum. The benefits were instantaneous and absolutely remarkable: without all his stuff, Sasaki finally felt true freedom, peace of mind, and appreciation for the present moment.Goodbye, Things explores why we measure our worth by the things we own and how the new minimalist movement will not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. Along the way, Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering tips on the minimizing process and revealing the profound ways he has changed since he got rid of everything he didnt need. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasakis humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalisms potential....

Title : Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780393609035
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 288 pages
Url Type : Home » Goodbye » Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism Reviews

  • Kelli

    I’m not interested in becoming this extreme of a minimalist, nor did this book hold my attention, though I did finish it. This is super extreme...as in you only need one fork and nothing on the walls, as in you don’t need chairs if you “host” your friends at a local restaurant and use the local cafe as your living room. I found the sweeping generalization that you cannot lead a life of gratitude whilst owning a lot of things to be a little offputting, not to mention, very subjective.

    Overall, I d
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  • Caro M.

    So you thought Marie Kondo was funny when she told us to get rid of the garbage in our homes and to only keep the stuff that gave us "sparks of joy"?

    Well, Fumio Sasaki goes deeper - he says it's awesome that there are things that give us those "sparks of joy" and he tells us to get rid of them all!!!

    Fumio is a minimalist and I dare say an extremist too - he got rid of 95% of the stuff he used to own, including hundreds of books, CDs, DVDs, expensive multimedia devices and fancy clothes and man
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  • Nguyễn Quang Vũ

    Đầu tiên phải nói về cái Tít. Quyển này có tên tiếng Nhựt Bổn là: "ぼくたちに、もうモノは必要ない。 断捨離からミニマリストへ". Đương nhiên là tớ copy paste chứ hiểu chết liền luôn nếu không có thằng Google Translate. Ý cái Tít là: Không cần cái gì nữa, tối giản đi mà sống ... Đại khái thế. Xuất bản bằng tiếng Anh thì nó tên là "Goodbye, Things: On Minimalist Living". Nói chung là không có chữ nào liên quan đến việc cả nước Nhật sống như thế cả. Cơ mà dân nhà mình xính ngoại. Kiểu làm dạy con làm giàu thì học người Do Thái ...more

  • Amanda NEVER MANDY

    **I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.**

    Nothing better than throwing out everything you own to make space for nothing. All you need is a bed that doubles as a couch, one set of dishes to cook and eat off of and one towel to dry said dishes and yourself off with. What an easy-peasy, simplified life.

    ARE YOU FREAKING KIDDING ME?!?!?! ONE TOWEL FOR EVERYTHING?!?!?!

    That was the moment I realized a minimalist lifestyle was not for me. I know the author says to each their own an
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  • Kathryn

    Fumio Sasaki takes minimalism to an entirely new level. I could not live in such a fundamental environment. I need beauty and plant life; my home is my sanctuary, not just a place to sleep. This lifestyle works for him and others, I am sure, but just not for me. I much prefer William Morris's quote "Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."

  • Cheryl

    More memoir than self-help, actually, as so much of what he says does *not* apply universally. And all his 'research' is just reported, there are no notes, bibliography, etc.

    Given that, he's got some great insights here. And each reader will find different bits of value to him or her. And it's short and gracefully written/ translated, so get it from your library if you're interested; give it a go.

    I liked the photos in the beginning of five different 'cases'--different people's examples. Incomple
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  • Ran

    This book is better than the last one I read on minimalism; but I think my complaint will forever be that these books are too long. However, I enjoyed this book more for its Japanese perspective on minimalism, and its reliance on Japanese culture for examples.*

    *That being said, Steve Jobs and Apple pop up often in this book.

  • Justin Tate

    I’m now a minimalist.