Read Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari Online

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanitys future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods.Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark stylethorough, yet rivetingfamine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda.What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake? Homo Deusexplores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first centuryfrom overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This isHomo Deus.With the same insight and clarity that made Sapiens an international hit and a New York Times bestseller, Harari maps out our future. ...

Title : Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow
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Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 450 pages
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Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow Reviews

  • Elena

    Awesome. This book, as the previous one by this author, goes directly to the shelf of my favourites.

    Some quotes.

    "Unlike the narrating self that controls us today, Google will not make decisions on the basis of cooked-up stories, and will not be misled by cognitive short cuts and the peak-end rule. Google will actually remember every step we took and every hand we shook."

    "In exchange for such devoted counselling services, we will just have to give up the idea that humans are individuals, and th
    ...more

  • Otis Chandler

    Sapiens was one of my favorite nonfiction books I've read in the past few years - so I was excited for the sequel. Overall, its very worth it and full of a lot of the interesting high level perspectives and frameworks. But it also lacks the clear structure of a coherent narrative, isn't presenting (to me) quite as novel information, and also does some strange things - like using the word 'liberal' in contexts that I don't think definitionally make sense.

    I like the train of the thought that Harar
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  • BlackOxford

    Tongue Firmly in Cheek

    Or

    The Mormons Are Right

    Or

    Evolution Is So Yesterday

    Or

    The Problems of Prayers Answered

    Or

    Too Much Good News Is Hard to Take

    Or

    It Could have Turned Out So Different; But It Didn’t

    Or

    All Thoughts and Feelings Are Algorithms; Except This One

    Or

    Fiction Is Our Fundamental Technology; Just Ask Donald Trump

    Or

    The Vital Uncertainty: We Can Have Meaning Or Power in Life But Not Both Together

    As with his previous book Sapiens, Harari tells a story in Homo Deus that is too disconcerting to
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  • Tudor Vlad

    I’ve only read one other book written by Yuval Noah Harari and that was Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, this follows in the steps of that to the point that it seems more like a sequel even if they can be read in whatever order you wish. Just as Sapiens, Homo Deus is a gripping book, I love Yuval’s writing style because it never bores me, he always manages to draw my full attention.

    Homo Deus is a book that wants to present the possible roads that the future might lead us to. It’s not a pr
    ...more

  • Cj Dufficy

    Certainly a disappointment when compared to Sapiens. The insights were generally already well presented in the earlier book. The section on animal lives is not convincingly warranted for inclusion but more obviously just a passion for the author leading me to feel I was being preached too. His criticism of Dawkins et al although correct could be equally pointed at himself. The universe will move from hot to cold regardless of quantum mechanical randomness at the quanta scale and equally at our b ...more

  • Ram

    Now that the Human kind, in the 20th century, has managed to control famine, plague and war, it is ready for it's next challenge.

    According to Yuval Noah Harari, the main reason that humans have managed to attain such a strong position in this planet is their ability to believe in "imaginary orders" such as countries, religion, money etc.

    Many believe that we have something in us that could be called a soul or consciousness or similar but it is not clear that this exists and our behavior could po
    ...more

  • Amir The Fat Bookworm

    A great and ausual book. When considering many more books about the same topic, "how we are going to be", Harari's arguments are more than satisfying and his reasonings are both terrifying and educated.

    I believe his warnings were the most accurate, I could have found on the topic of technologies and how they may be a danger to us.

    So there are so many people, like Hawkins that try to warn us about future AI uprising, which any sci-fi author from 90's could counter argue effectively and easily.
    ...more

  • Weronika

    The book is hugely disappointing. A year or so ago I read an interview with Harari on this book, which was still work in progress, and I found his views on biological inequality (and, to a lesser extent, the decoupling of intelligence from consciousness) very insightful. Actually, it was that interview that inspired me to read Sapiens, which, despite certain flaws, unfortunately amplified in Deus, is a book definitely worth reading. Meanwhile, Deus is wordy, chaotic and repetitive; most of the b ...more