Read Skin in the Game: The Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life (Incerto #5) by Nassim Nicholas Taleb Online

Skin in the Game: The Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life (Incerto #5)

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Black Swan, a bold new work that challenges many of our long-held beliefs about risk and reward, politics and religion, finance and personal responsibility In his most provocative and practical book yet, one of the foremost thinkers of our time redefines what it means to understand the world, succeed in a profession, contribute to a fair and just society, detect nonsense, and influence others. Citing examples ranging from Hammurabi to Seneca, Antaeus the Giant to Donald Trump, Nassim Nicholas Taleb shows how the willingness to accept ones own risks is an essential attribute of heroes, saints, and flourishing people in all walks of life. As always both accessible and iconoclastic, Taleb challenges long-held beliefs about the values of those who spearhead military interventions, make financial investments, and propagate religious faiths. Among his insights: For social justice,focus on symmetry and risk sharing. You cannot make profits and transfer the risks to others, as bankers and large corporations do. You cannot get rich without owning your own risk and paying for your own losses. Forcing skin in the game corrects this asymmetry better than thousands of laws and regulations. Ethical rules arent universal. Youre part of a group larger than you, but its still smaller than humanity in general. Minorities, not majorities, run the world. The world is not run by consensus but by stubborn minorities imposing their tastes and ethics on others. You can be an intellectual yet still be an idiot. Educated philistines have been wrong on everything from Stalinism to Iraq to low-carb diets. Beware of complicated solutions (that someone was paid to find). A simple barbell can build muscle better than expensive new machines. True religion is commitment, not just faith. How much you believe in something is manifested only by what youre willing to risk for it.The phrase skin in the game is one we have often heard but rarely stopped to truly dissect. It is the backbone of risk management, but its also an astonishingly rich worldview that, as Taleb shows in this book, applies to all aspects of our lives. As Taleb says, The symmetry of skin in the game is a simple rule thats necessary for fairness and justice, and the ultimate BS-buster, and Never trust anyone who doesnt have skin in the game. Without it, fools and crooks will benefit, and their mistakes will never come back to haunt them....

Title : Skin in the Game: The Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life (Incerto #5)
Author :
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ISBN : 9780241300657
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 272 pages
Url Type : Home » Skin » Skin in the Game: The Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life (Incerto #5)

Skin in the Game: The Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life (Incerto #5) Reviews

  • Gaurav Mathur

    Aah, Taleb. I have read all his non-technical books at least twice, so of course it was with great enthusiasm that I bought this... SITG.

    Bit of a bummer.

    SITG has some great insights, but most of them were shared on his Twitter account, and his posts on Medium. That is:

    (SITG book - Previous works - Medium posts = few new insights)

    Also, a bit of complaining about how his ideas were not listened to.

    But of course applaud the man for pursuing his ideas for more than 2 decades. Have learned quite a lo
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  • Zahwil

    Few authors through their writing have the ability to make one really think; Taleb is one of the few who can and does.

    There are many ways to be critical about this book, and the criticisms would not be groundless.

    For one, Taleb expresses contempt for many present-day scholars such as Steven Pinker, Richard Thaler, and Thomas Picketty. One of the nicer expressions he coins for this group is IYI (Intellectual Yet Idiot).

    As is usually the case, an attack on another tends to reflect more on onese
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  • Nilesh

    SITG is an angry rant. It lacks structure. The core message - mainly because of the author’s often misplaced and wrong arguments against his self-created adversaries - is never examined beyond the title’s most known or intuitive conventional meaning. The basic concept is at least as old as the adage itself. The author does little to bolster the claim while spending all efforts on slamming real or imagined opponents. The book’s frequent diversions along with internal contradictions amid a rather ...more

  • Denis Vasilev

    Рациональность как выживание, связь действий с результатом. Есть хорошие дополнения к привычной картине рассмотрения религий с позиции их «рациональности». Как обычно идет мочилово неугодных автору академиков и наук.

  • Philippe

    Taleb’s ‘Skin in the Game’ has been put together in a somewhat disorderly way, but the reasoning goes as follows:

    1. The world in which we live is complex and eludes our sense-making faculties.

    2. Our society has cultivated a privileged class of Intellectuals Yet Idiots (IYIs). These people monopolize positions of authority and routinely take decisions to intervene in that complex world, without however doing the effort to think through the cascading impacts of these decisions and being convenient
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  • Stephan

    “The mark of a charlatan is to defend his position or attack a critic by focusing on some specific statement (“ look at what he said”) rather than blasting his exact position (“ look at what he means” or, more broadly, “look at what he stands for”)— for the latter requires an extensive grasp of the proposed idea.”

    This quote from Mr. Taleb perfectly summarizes my problems with his book.

    The general theme of the book is that one should be wary of those making decisions who lack consequences of thos
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  • Magnus Ahmad

    Pop-science in it's lowest form. Book reads like a poorly researched, hastily written college essay. Strings together a few nuggets of common sense wisdom with sizeable amounts of unreferenced BS. Taleb is a shark, living off a reputation and using his own fanbase like an ATM.

  • Tim O'Hearn

    I read this book a few months ago and enjoyed it. Taleb is kind of dickish but he often succeeds in making me question whether I'm smart enough to grasp what he's saying. This brings a special level of excitement to reading any of his works. To me, they present a challenge. A crossword puzzle of intellect with some pseudo elements.

    The underlying concept in this book is evident from the title. It's an extrapolation of the principle-agent problem. Most of my notes from my original reading have bee
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